Alone and Awesome

Being single, silly, and secure

Don’t Hate/Celebrate What You Don’t Understand

Hey there, dear peoples of mine!

I am pleased that you have returned again.

I am posting on St. Valentine’s day with a purpose. For a long time I thought I knew what Valentine’s day was all about. Chocolate, boys, candy, boys, romance, chocolate, and maybe a card. Yep! Valentine’s day, right?

You: No, you forgot the grief of being alone on Valentine’s day.

Me: ‘Forgot’ is such an ugly word. Nevertheless, I did not forget those who suffer. That’s why I’m here! Being alone for Valentine’s day’s is a hobby of mine.

You: … You are crazy.

Me: Yes, but that’s a different discussion entirely.

Back on point; how much do you know about the real holiday of St. Valentine’s Day? Or, rather, how much do you know about St. Valentine? He was a real person; in fact the name “Valentine,” was a rather popular name long ago so there are more than one St. Valentine.

I’ll cut straight to the point.

St. Valentine’s Day, February 14th, is the day that St. Valentine was beheaded. He was arrested and eliminated because he insisted on secretly marrying young couples in the Christian way, harboring Christians, and refused to renounce his faith.

Now, maybe you want to set aside that head-shaped box of chocolate for a moment? Just until you are done with this post. After that you may continue to feast on the rich and creamy fat forming goodness.

St. Valentine lived long ago, though very little is known about him. There is rumored to be more than one St. Valentine, which would not be surprising. As I said before, the name of Valentine was very popular. It is a word derived from the Roman family name of Valentinus, which came from the Latin word valens, which means “strong, worthy, healthy, etc.”

Here is one thing I found via catholic.com, (The Catholic’s have a Saint for every day of the year, in fact there are many St. Valentine’s Days throughout the year, I’ll hit on those as well).

I have done a lot of studying on how St. Valentine’s Day became connected to romance. After reading about who St. Valentine was I was puzzled.

-Me: What does a beheading have to do with chocolate and romance???

So here is one thing I found that I feel answers that question well. [Source: catholic.com]

***

Full Question

Who was St. Valentine, and how did his feast day of February 14 come to be regarded as a day for romance?

Answer

Two Valentines are listed in the Roman Martyrology for February 14. The first was a Roman priest who reportedly was martyred on the Flaminian Way during the reign of the Emperor Claudius. The other Valentine was a third-century bishop of Terni who was martyred in Rome but whose relics were sent back to his home see. Some claim that there has been a confusion and that the two Valentines are really one.

The reason the feast day has come to be associated with romance has nothing to do with the two saints, neither of whom had a clear connection to lovers or courtship. The association has to do with a belief, dating at least from the time of Chaucer, that birds pair up on February 14. This belief about biology became associated with the feast of the day, and eventually the thought of courtship and romance came to dominate. In any event, the Church certainly does not teach that Valentine’s Day should be celebrated in connection with romance.

***

So now we know that St. Valentine’s Day has nothing to do with romance, candy, chocolate, cards, boys, or anything of that nature. We made that stuff up.

Do you feel better yet about being alone on one of the biggest hallmark holidays known to man?

For more reading, I enjoyed this Explanation of St. Valentine’s Day greatly. [Source: Catholic Online.] Just click on the link. There is a small movie to go with it and it has a lot of good stuff in there.

FYI; I’m not Catholic. St. Valentine’s Day is.

In the source above it tells of the blind girl whom St. Valentine restored the sight of to prove to her father, the Judge, the validity of our Lord, Jesus the Christ. St. Valentine did just that and restored the girl’s sight. It then goes to tell the story of St. Valentine marrying young couples and aiding Christians that were being prosecuted. He was imprisoned for this and told that if he did not renounced his faith he would be beaten and then beheaded.

St. Valentine refused and was beheaded, but a part in this story says he left a note for the girl he had restored the sight of and on the note it was sighed “Your Valentine.”

I assumed this was part of the reason there are Valentine’s Day Cards and people use the cheesy line, “Will you be my Valentine?”

Umm, are you aware that you’re asking the person if they want to be beaten and beheaded?

No?

I didn’t think so.

There is nothing really romantic at all about St. Valentine’s Day. However, the more I studied the more I found. There is a lot out there, and a lot of it is myth. No one knows for sure who St. Valentine was. There were a lot of them.

Below is a part of the second link I gave you.

***

Other saints with the same name

The name “Valentine”, derived from valens (worthy, strong, powerful), was popular in Late Antiquity. About eleven other saints having the name Valentine are commemorated in the Roman Catholic Church.[18] Some Eastern Churches of the Western rite may provide still other different lists of Saint Valentines.[19] The Roman martyrology lists only seven who died on days other than February 14: a priest from Viterbo (November 3); a bishop from Raetia who died in about 450 (January 7); a fifth-century priest and hermit (July 4); a Spanish hermit who died in about 715 (October 25); Valentine Berrio Ochoa, martyred in 1861 (November 24); and Valentine Jaunzarás Gómez, martyred in 1936 (September 18). It also lists a virgin, Saint Valentina, who was martyred in 308 (July 25) in Caesarea, Palestine.[20]

***

So, there you go. Pick your St. Valentine’s Day!

Jan. 7
Feb. 14
July 4 & 25
Oct 25
Nov 3 & 24
Sep. 18

Though the fact that February is the month when the birds found their mate makes it a tiny bit more romantic. Just because birds can do that.

Spring time strikes again.

I feel awkward this time of season when I walk into a store and my eyes are dazed by the explosion of pink and red waiting on the other side. Like the glare of light. I am going to be seeing hearts before my eyes for at least a week! I am happy some people get a kick out of St. Valentine’s Day, but here is what I personally think.

February 14th is two separate holidays with one nearly identical name.

The feast of St. Valentine is called St. Valentine’s Day.

The celebration of love and romance is Valentine’s Day.

Does that make sense? Are we all good here? Figure out what you’re celebrating a why. I’m sure I’d be all fluttery in the chest is some cute guy asked me to be his Valentine. Of course, I’d then ask him, “You want me beheaded?” And test his knowledge of St. Valentine’s Day right then and there! But the thing is I don’t want anyone to be gloomy on this day. I could say the old line, “It’s just another day!” But I’m not going to.

If Valentine’s Day is about love then show some love to yourself. Pamper yourself a little more than usual. Treat yourself to a great dinner. Do something you enjoy. I don’t like to see people sad, especially ladies that think they’re unimportant because they don’t get a gift on the day where everything triples in price.

Love yourself.

It’s much more rewarding and peaceful.

In closing, I guess I just want to give all you single women, (and men), something to think about when the commercials, TV specials, stores and restaurants try to tell you you’re nothing without a significant other.

Just say these simple words:

“St. Valentine died a gruesome death today!!! Show some respect, you card pushing sales people!”

All better? All better.

Happy St. Valentine’s Day, peoples!

E. L.

Content titled with “source” is not of my own creation. Parts were copied from links and pasted as reading reference. All rights of these portions are reserved to Catholic Online and catholic.com. The rest is mine.

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